Misha Sakharoff
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How to use your wake up clock to optimise breathing?

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One of the most powerful  means to help optimise breathing is to reduce breathing volume by means of relaxation of the diaphragm muscles in the belly region. It’s the whole essence of two of the strongest existing breathing optimization techniques. Buteyko technique which essence is normalisation of automatic breathing patterns. And old traditional Pranayama which in practice means controlling and expanding the pause after exhalation.

But have you ever missed your focus on your diaphragm muscles and your awareness during your breathing practice? I did – many times… Now I found it easier to remain focused with help of this little 3$ app called “Insight Timer”. It provides you with different nice gong sounds to promote alertness during meditation. I use it myself and nudge my clients too for practicing active relaxation, one pointed attention and reduced breathing during the day. Reminders like this has become an integral part of my Ki-Kaizen training system. This smart reminder app let you chose time interval for your practice. I set it to 12 hours training time and choose 5 minute intervals. With some training you will be able to adjust the bell or gong sound so only your own ears can hear it. Your surroundings will hardly notice it – but it requires some training and little tweaking 😉

The reward is very big – you can prolong your reduced breathing practice to much longer time periods. I encourage my cancer clients and other seriously ill to use it to greatly extend their daily practice time. Their breathing awareness is restored every 5th minute extending breathing practice up to 12 hours. Not bad at all 🙂

About the Author Misha Sakharoff

My burning interest in human physiology is rooted in far-different areas of expertise such as martial arts, music and long professional career. My core competency lies in the combination of physiological knowledge regarding stress mechanisms and their close relationship with respiration, muscular tension and body balance.

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